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How is this situation managed?

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  • How is this situation managed?

    I also posted this in another thread, but figured it might be better positioned here. Sorry for the double-post:

    Most of us on these boards apply for multiple jobs in the law enforcement community, local and federal. How do you deal with applications that are ongoing simultaneously, after you have been selected for one of the departments to which you have applied?

    I process for APD on 12/3, but I would be a liar if I said I was going to drop the applications that I have for a few federal agencies. How should I proceed if I get a phone call to proceed to the next step in one of the fed processes? For instance, if I get a call for a panel interview for one of the agencies and I am still in the APD academy, what do I tell the fed agency? Ask them if I can reschedule in 6 months when the academy is over? Ask them if there is any way to find a time that is outside of normal working hours?

    I applied for the FAM position that was recently opened. If selected to proceed, I am required to travel to the field office for further processing (panel interview, etc). I am assuming that would be near impossible to accomplish while I am in the academy for a local PD?

    Any advice/feedback from those who have experienced these situations is greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.

  • #2
    A lot of the deputies I worked with were in similar situations. There's really only a couple of options. You really should keep all your options going as long as you can, but once you say yes to one, you'll just have to deny the others as they come along. Some of the guys turned down different jobs until they got the one they wanted, others just said yes to the first one that they got through. With your situation with your local PD, it may just be that you have to tell them that you are leaving if you get a federal offer. They will understand, or if not, it happens. Look at it this way, you won't be the first to have done it, and neither will you be the last.

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    • #3
      If you are hired by APD, I would just put off my applications for other agencies at least for that probationary year.

      So what if you don't get in the feds as fast as you originally wanted? You may find you really like it being a patrol officer. Even if you do still want to work for the feds, you may find that the skills you picked up patrolling the streets of a major city are very valuable. Have patience, this isn't a sprint, it's a marathon, unless of course you are quickly approaching the 37 year age limit for federal leo jobs.
      What is Perseverance?
      -Perseverance is commitment, hard work, patience, endurance.
      -Perseverance is being able to bear difficulties calmly and without complaint.
      -PERSEVERANCE IS TRYING AGAIN AND AGAIN.


      BOP - BPA - ICE

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      • #4
        Contrary to what gtstq suggested, I would not tell your current employer you will be leaving if you get a Federal offer. You will be on probation for a considerable amount of time once you get out of the academy. During probation, most agencies can terminate you without cause. It costs a lot of money to sent you through the academy and run you through an FTO program. Telling your current employer you are testing for a better job and will leave if you get an offer, gives them absolutely no incentive to invest another penny in your training. Plus, it gives them the best motive I can think of to cut their losses and dump you on probation now.

        Similarly, if I were on your oral panel and learned that you were currently in the academy with another agency, my first impression would be that you are a job hopper with what is about to become an unstable work history. If you can't be trusted to stay that long with your current agency before you bail out, I certainly wouldn't trust you stay very long with mine and would probably fail you on the oral.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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        • #5
          L-1, I agree with you on certain parts, and I was simply assuming that Flyer was farther along with his applications, i.e. getting close to receiving a full offer. Also, I didn't mean to imply that he should immediately tell his current agency about his attempt to gain federal employment, although he would have to before his background check. I simply meant he should keep all his options open and that he should be prepared to resign if the opportunity came up, but keep everything going as long as possible.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by L-1 View Post
            Contrary to what gtstq suggested, I would not tell your current employer you will be leaving if you get a Federal offer. You will be on probation for a considerable amount of time once you get out of the academy. During probation, most agencies can terminate you without cause. It costs a lot of money to sent you through the academy and run you through an FTO program. Telling your current employer you are testing for a better job and will leave if you get an offer, gives them absolutely no incentive to invest another penny in your training. Plus, it gives them the best motive I can think of to cut their losses and dump you on probation now.

            Similarly, if I were on your oral panel and learned that you were currently in the academy with another agency, my first impression would be that you are a job hopper with what is about to become an unstable work history. If you can't be trusted to stay that long with your current agency before you bail out, I certainly wouldn't trust you stay very long with mine and would probably fail you on the oral.
            I agree that he shouldn't tell them (unless they directly ask you, I wouldn't lie) but I completely disagree with your comment about "job hopping." If a person can explain why they left one job for another and their explanation is sound and logical it's not going to be held against them. Case in point: I got out of the Army, became substitute teacher to make ends meet, took a job as a FAM for a short time, hated it and left and took a job as a contractor for my current agency, did that for 6 months and took a supervisor job at my current agency as a Fed employee and I just accepted a job with ICE as a SA. In my background investigation they asked me this exact question, why have you had 5 jobs in 2 years...I told him it was simple and explained what my long term goal was (which is to be a SA for ICE) and how working fraud cases at my current agency was a step in the perfect direction etc etc etc. He actually agreed with me and said that my experience was going to be invaluable to my future career.

            It's all in how it's worded....
            Last edited by ifineed2; 11-24-2009, 07:24 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ifineed2 View Post
              I agree that he shouldn't tell them (unless they directly ask you, I wouldn't lie) but I completely disagree with your comment about "job hopping." If a person can explain why they left one job for another and their explanation is sound and logical it's not going to be held against them. Case in point: I got out of the Army, became substitute teacher to make ends meet, took a job as a FAM for a short time, hated it and left and took a job as a contractor for my current agency, did that for 6 months and took a supervisor job at my current agency as a Fed employee and I just accepted a job with ICE as a SA. In my background investigation they asked me this exact question, why have you had 5 jobs in 2 years...I told him it was simple and explained what my long term goal was (which is to be a SA for ICE) and how working fraud cases at my current agency was a step in the perfect direction etc etc etc. He actually agreed with me and said that my experience was going to be invaluable to my future career.

              It's all in how it's worded....
              I would definitely not tell them until I received a final offer from a fed agency. During the panel with the fed, I will simply tell them that my main goal was getting into law enforcement and that I didn't want to pass up the APD opportunity and possibly be left with nothing in the end.

              I began the process for USSS well before APD. I think there are plenty of ways to explain myself to avoid being seen as a job hopper. In addition, I specifically asked someone about this situation at USSS, and I was told that there are plenty of people who start an academy with a different agency, only to leave the academy and go to the new opportunity.

              Oh yeah, I will be 32 in a couple months, so playing with a 5-yr window of time for the fed agencies.

              Thanks for all of the feedback!

              Comment


              • #8
                Its already been said a few times, but I just wanted to reiterate the fact that there is a difference between job hopping and setting career goals for yourself. If you were jumping between local jobs as often as the weather changes, well, thats job hopping. But if you start out local, then on to a Federal Agency, who is going to fault you for that? It helps to cultivate contacts throughout your career as well. I started out at a local department for 2 years then moved on to the NJ State Park Police. From there I went on to be a county investigator and now I'm trying to go Federal. If I'm successful, I will have contacts in every level of law enforcement, (local, county, state, and federal), which is pretty cool. That being said, you do need to keep your cards as close to your chest as possible. While no one would blame you for leaving APD to take a Federal position, APD would certainly be within their rights to cut you loose if they think you have one foot out of the door.

                Comment

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