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  • National Guard

    Can one be in the guard and go 1811 in USSS, DEA, DSS, FBI, etc....? I think I read on here that USSS doesn't allow it, but what about the others?

    Also I know that:

    The special agent position is designated as a key position in accordance with Department of Defense Directive 1200.7. As such, employees occupying this position who are in the military reserve will have their status changed to either Retired Reserve or Standby Reserve, or may be discharged, as determined by the military.


    Does this mean you can still apply for the USSS and if selected you are simply withdrawn from your guard contract?
    Last edited by 1811orBust; 09-25-2009, 09:41 AM.

  • #2
    1811orBust,

    I'm pretty sure FBI, ATF, and DEA require you to go inactive or standby reserve during the academy, and then allow you to go back to normal reserve status once graduated.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Gibbo03 View Post
      1811orBust,

      I'm pretty sure FBI, ATF, and DEA require you to go inactive or standby reserve during the academy, and then allow you to go back to normal reserve status once graduated.
      This is absolutely correct; the above agencies will require an applicant to go inactive while the applicant is at FLETC or Quanitico. Once the applicant graduates they may be able to resume their former status, or be asked to continue being inactive for a short time more.
      sigpicTwo is one,
      one is none.

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      • #4
        I dont know about the agencies stated above but I got friends who are in Border Patrol and in the USDM and they are still in the reserves. In fact both of those guys dont really show up to drill at all because they are always busy and their jobs are over the reserves.

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        • #5
          So is this inactive status guaranteed or does the unit have to permit it? That's what I'm trying to learn. Like if I went into the guard, and got an 1811 position, would I automatically be permitted to go inactive?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 1811orBust View Post
            So is this inactive status guaranteed or does the unit have to permit it? That's what I'm trying to learn. Like if I went into the guard, and got an 1811 position, would I automatically be permitted to go inactive?
            No it is not automatic.

            Even the USSS which as the authority to make the request, there is a resent MSPB decision on this, there request is not automatic. (see David M. Baker v. Department of Homeland Security, May 18, 2009)

            “It noted that, under DOD Directive No. 1200.7, the Secret Service is generally required to review annually whether it has employees who are members of the military reserves and occupy “key” civilian positions; that the Secret Service had determined that Special Agents and Uniformed Division members occupy such positions; and that the reserves are generally required to reassign or transfer such members from mobilization status. It noted, however, that this military reserve screening process is suspended during mobilization and that the military reserves have been mobilized since September 2001. It stated that, if an employee is mobilized, only the agency Secretary can request an exemption and such exemption will be requested or granted only in rare circumstances.”

            Since we are under partial mobilization, if you are a reservist or NG member when hired, they can not change your status until after this national crisis.

            This subject has many layers to it. Not a cut and dry situation. Your unit commander (NG/Reserve) can make it easy or hard depending on his perception of your need to the unit.

            http://www.mspb.gov/netsearch/viewdo...cation=ACROBAT
            "From now until the end of the world, we and it shall be remembered. We few, we Band of Brothers. For he who sheds his blood with me shall be my brother." - William Shakespeare ("King Henry V")

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            • #7
              So if I enlist in the Guard as an officer or whatever and then apply to become an 1811, could my being in the Guard hurt my application chances?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 1811orBust View Post
                So if I enlist in the Guard as an officer or whatever and then apply to become an 1811, could my being in the Guard hurt my application chances?
                Membership in the Guard or Reserve cannot be used as a means by which to disqualiy an applicant. You are protected by the Soldier and Sailor act.
                Life is what happens while you are waiting for something better to come along.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1811orBust View Post
                  So if I enlist in the Guard as an officer or whatever and then apply to become an 1811, could my being in the Guard hurt my application chances?
                  Legally, no it cannot count against you. However, there is a grey area. You won't find it on any OPM Website or any written policy. It's a subtle thing that will come to light if you decide to pursue that route. Think long and hard about that decision if 1811 is your first priority.
                  Last edited by rbakous1; 09-25-2009, 05:38 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 1811orBust View Post
                    So if I enlist in the Guard as an officer or whatever and then apply to become an 1811, could my being in the Guard hurt my application chances?
                    There are positive & negative to all life decisions. This includes military service.

                    Positive
                    * Serving your country
                    * Training
                    * Unique life experiences
                    * Friends that will last a lifetime
                    * Veterans preference (if your serve qualifies)
                    * College money
                    * Some extra money

                    Negative
                    * Your time is not your own (subject to orders, when, where, how, etc)
                    * Real danger (our nation is at war)
                    * Social & Professional stigma (silent prejudice)

                    As mentioned on this board, they won’t say why they did not hire you, but it was because you have to put the nation first, and the agency does not like the competition.

                    It is much easier to sound patriotic then to be the patriot. As a soldier, sailor, marine or airman, you may be called on to willingly give your life.

                    This is no small commitment that you are contemplating.

                    First line of the code of conduct:

                    I am American fighting in the forces that guard my country and protect our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.
                    "From now until the end of the world, we and it shall be remembered. We few, we Band of Brothers. For he who sheds his blood with me shall be my brother." - William Shakespeare ("King Henry V")

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                    • #11
                      I've actually served so I know the commitment. Was just hoping to hear from some agents on here whether they've served. Doesn't appear that way.

                      Thanks.

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