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BI for naturalized citizen?

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  • BI for naturalized citizen?

    Haven't found a lot of info on this topic. Assuming the situation of a naturalized US citizen being in the application process with federal agencies (FBI, IRS, ICE and DEA) for 1811 positions, and with state, county and local police, would a 5 year length of history in the US make it worthless to apply?

    Let's assume that the candidate is competent and does bring decent skills to the table - for instance, accounting skills, foreign language, engineering degree, clean background, physical fitness etc, can the issue of not having lived in the US long enough (5 - 5.5 years) at the time of applying be a deal breaker, from doing the BI point of view?

    Would this be the same across the table with all agencies, or are police agencies likely to be a little more lenient than federal agencies (based on the assumption that it might not matter to a local PD if the family lives overseas, vs let's say, the FBI, or that school or most of the childhood was in a different country)?

    Also, is it true that one must have been naturalized for at least a year before being considered by the Feds (internal policy I believe), I think I read it somewhere on a message board.

    Anyone know of anyone who got hired without too much of a length or history in this country (by any agency at any level)? Trying to find some motivation here..

    I personally believe that local LE might be a little open on this since there are agencies that will hire people with green cards, so they must have taken the possibility of foreign contacts, school overseas, friends overseas etc. into consideration. Would this be accurate?

    Yes, I am talking about myself and this is a future scenario (not naturalized yet, but close to being eligible).

    Appreciate any inputs..thanks much..hope this does not fall into the category of a "crystal ball" question..

  • #2
    Many years ago I was assigned to do a background on an applicant who lived in Morocco. I was very excited and asked my department for an advance on travel expenses and an plane ticket. Sadly they had me send the background to the Moroccan national police and ask them to do it for us.

    Times have now changed and most state and local agencies will send the background to the FBI law enforcement liaison in the nearest embassy or consulate and ask for their assistance in completing the background.
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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    • #3
      I can give you some info on the 1811 (federal side of the house).

      FBI/DEA requires TS clearance as a condition of employment. You can not be a duel citizen and get a TS clearance. You may have to renounce your previous citizenship and officially dispose of your foreign passport.

      What country your original citizenship is from is a very important variable and your current ties. You been a citizen for less than a year and a resident for less than 6 years this will be a variable. Longer is better. Do you travel home often? This is another variable. It would be difficult not impossible.

      ICE requires you to have lived in the US for the last three years before you can apply.

      IRS CI is at first a suitability determination, they do not require a TS clearance initially, just the ability to get one (suitability determination).

      There is hope. I am a naturalized citizen who holds security clearances, and I am on the final stage of my current background for an 1811 position (IRS).
      "From now until the end of the world, we and it shall be remembered. We few, we Band of Brothers. For he who sheds his blood with me shall be my brother." - William Shakespeare ("King Henry V")

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      • #4
        Naturalization

        Just my two cents on this one. Once someone becomes a naturalized citizen, they renounce their former citizenship from their native country. That being said, you technically do not hold "dual" citizenship. If you look closely at a naturalization certificate, it clearly states COUNTRY OF FORMER NATIONALITY. If you have any other questions, just pm me.
        *****CBP Officer*****
        Hot South Texas

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        • #5
          Originally posted by genolrd View Post
          Just my two cents on this one. Once someone becomes a naturalized citizen, they renounce their former citizenship from their native country. That being said, you technically do not hold "dual" citizenship. If you look closely at a naturalization certificate, it clearly states COUNTRY OF FORMER NATIONALITY. If you have any other questions, just pm me.
          Yaa, right.

          Since I am a naturalized citizen who hold security clearance, and is going through the process to become an 1811.

          I don't know what I am talking about. Wow. Your dangerously FOS

          Actually gaining US Citizenship does not require you to give up your previous citizenship or your passport.

          Go to fedsoup and read threads in Security Clearance section. You can post there and there is Fed Background Investigators and adjudicator on that board.
          "From now until the end of the world, we and it shall be remembered. We few, we Band of Brothers. For he who sheds his blood with me shall be my brother." - William Shakespeare ("King Henry V")

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          • #6
            Nothing like an applicant arguing with a US Immigration Officer about Immigration Law.

            Becoming Naturalized as a USC does require you to renounce your foreign citizenship, (whether or not the foreign country recognizes the renunciation is another story) however it does NOT require you to give up your foreign passport. As far as US Immigration Law is concerned, "dual citizenship" doesn't really exist. If you are a US citizen, that's it, no other foreign citizenships are recognized or really matter, when it comes to your immigration status.

            Now, as far as suitability for a Fed LE position, it's going to vary based on the agency. ICE/CBP/CIS and several others are going to be more stringent when it comes to this stuff, due to the possibility of conflicts of interest.

            To the OP: I would assume that 5 years continuous residence would be plenty for just about any agency, but that's purely conjecture on my part. Best course of action might be to contact IA/OIG and maybe HR of the agency you're planning on applying to. Most of the time the residency requirements are spelled out in the vacancy announcement on USAJobs.

            As far as State/Local level LE, I can't imagine any of them would have any issues hiring a Natz. USC with over 5 years residence, but again, best bet would be to contact those agencies directly.
            Last edited by Dreamcrusher; 09-19-2009, 07:27 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Scout0315 View Post
              Yaa, right.

              Since I am a naturalized citizen who hold security clearance, and is going through the process to become an 1811.

              I don't know what I am talking about. Wow. Your dangerously FOS

              Actually gaining US Citizenship does not require you to give up your previous citizenship or your passport.

              Go to fedsoup and read threads in Security Clearance section. You can post there and there is Fed Background Investigators and adjudicator on that board.
              Wow, really? You're saying you know more about immigration than I do? I'm not here to argue, I'm just stating the truth. Re-read my post. I never said you had to give up your passport, just your citizenship. According to US Law, the US Govt does not recognize dual citizenship. If you think I'm FOS then read this. Straight from the book 8 CFR 337.1 under Oath of Allegiance "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely RENOUNCE and abjure all ALLEGIANCE and FIDELITY to any foreign prince, protentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen." Once you naturalize, you can apply for any federal job without a problem. Some agencies may just require you have a couple of years (2-3) as a USC. Most people who are in the military are LPR (Legal Permanent Residents) and hold a secret or top secret clearance.
              *****CBP Officer*****
              Hot South Texas

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