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  • Wife with a few questions...

    Hi all, the last time I posted I was very lucky to get such great advice for my husband and our family so thank you all very much!

    Now... my husband has explored a whole lot of options career wise and he's somewhat settled on making the switch from the Marine Corps to the Police Force- which force, he has no idea. We currently live in California but would like to move to Boston sometime in the future but have been told along with the residency requirements that getting a job on the BPD is next to impossible.

    That said, we're open to moving anywhere! My husband is currently a Staff Sergeant with 2 years left before his EAS. As much as he loves the Marine Corps, he's definitely feeling the pain of being away from our 3 young sons as much as he is with deployments, month long field ops etc, etc. At that time of his EAS he would have been in for 13 years, so what would be the best route to go for us in making the switch? Does anyone have any first hand experience with the LAPD?

    Anything you could suggest for him/us to do to get the ball rolling would be great!

    TIA.

  • #2
    Getting a police job anywhere in Massachusetts is next to impossible right now. Once you move here you would have to establish residency for a year and he will have to take the civil service exam which they will prob not give for another 2 years since they just had one. There is also a list of 100+ laid of cops that they would re-hire first anyway.

    New Hampshire is actively hiring though and departments up there are very pro military...not to far away from Boston.

    Any questions let me know.

    Comment


    • #3
      Vermont and upstate ny are also good to look at

      M-11
      “All men dream...... But not equally..
      Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it is vanity;
      but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men,
      for they act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible.....”

      TE Lawrence

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the reply! Do you know if they'd start the hiring process while my husband was still out here? Is that even possible? We're trying to not have a whole lot of time (months, I mean) where he'd be unemployed which is why we thought staying local would be the best option for us... But if departments hire sight unseen per se, that would definitely make our dream of being on the East Coast something we could seriously explore...

        Comment


        • #5
          For me, mostly! My hubby loves it out here, but I want to go to Grad School in Boston and settle there permanently so I was hoping to end up there sooner rather than later given that the hubby has decided to get out and we have some freedom of choice now :-)
          Last edited by Mia; 07-20-2009, 04:21 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            How do you find out which places are actively hiring?

            Comment


            • #7
              In the careers section on this website you can find some departments that are actively hiring.

              Also go into other state forums in here and ask questions on department that are hiring in their respective state.

              Theres always a police department somewhere in the country that needs officers real real bad, you just got to do your research. Good luck

              Comment


              • #8
                Mia check out masscops.com

                There is a forum there with a wealth of knowledge about the area and posted jobs in MA and the New England area.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My two cents.

                  With the economy and job market the way they are...and with 13 years in (well over the halfway mark), I'd seriously consider a re-enlistment. I realize that his MOS and unit's optempo may be factors as well, necessitating another deployment that neither of you want to endure. I also realize you may already be in "EAS-mode" and thinking of "taking your pack off" and how great that would be. But opportunities out here in the civilian sector are not exactly plentiful right now. Might be better to wait, put in some more time towards that military retirement, and re-assess what's going on a few years down the road.

                  If it's the MOS/optempo issue, I would even give some considertion to another service branch in order to finish out those 20 years before I'd get out completely.

                  It'd be much easier for you to go to grad school and your husband to start a second career if you were already enjoying the benefits of having retired from that first career - you'd have a retirement check, of course, but also medical coverage, PX & commissary, etc. At that point, you could afford to be choosy about where you want to live and what LE job your husband wants. Right now, I think you may find it tough to attain the goals you're looking at.
                  "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, I disagree. I believe you CAN go from point A to point B to C, etc. I did, as have many other people. In fact, I'd wager that MOST people don't get to where they ultimately want to be by the most direct route imaginable. If they do, they should consider themselves fortunate.

                    Also, if he has 13 years under his belt, he can retire in 7, not "15 years or so." And no one is advising the OP to "spend 20 years planning for something." I simply advised a delay.

                    To add to my initial post, I figured that the destination of Boston for grad school was because there was family there, maybe inlaws to watch kids while mom goes to school and dad works full time. But I saw in another thread where the OP said she was from Australia.

                    If there are no specific ties to Beantown, why not at least start grad school now, in CA? Take small bites out of a master's degree (instead of a huge one - and a huge commitment if it's not working out). That way you can test the waters first; take a few courses and transition gradually instead of taking the large step of putting an end to one career to embark upon another. Do this while your husband keeps working on the retirement and putting money in the TSP. Maybe he can lat-move to a different MOS if that's an issue, maybe even to one that allows him to become more marketable or gives him time to do some schooling on the side: there's no guarantee that being a Marine, alone, is going to get him a job in LE, these days, so padding his resume in the interim won't hurt.

                    I just wouldn't throw away 13 years towards a pension, regardless whether something else in life happens to be beckoning or not.

                    True story: my wife has a friend whose husband gave up a career as a Navy officer at the 12 year mark to - ironically - move to the Boston area and work on his master's at MIT. They have 2 boys, who were 12 and 9 at the time. Slightly different scenario, but the circumstances they faced were similar to what the OP and her husband might find there. Mainly, a VERY expensive place to live and work. They had to actually sell their wedding china at one point. And they had saved quite a bit of money beforehand. Plus, the economy was a lot better back then (late 90's), so she found a job rather quickly.

                    Anyway, the OP and her husband have 2 years to figure it out, whatever path they choose.
                    "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would have to say that staying in the military is the best option at this point. With 13 years in and the rank he has made it would be wise to tough it out for 7 years and leave with some retirement pay and benefits. He has invested a lot of time in the service and I know how he feels in a way. I just separated from the military with only 5.5 years in and it's tough in the civillian world. Its kind of hard readjusting after just 5 years so I can imagine how it would be for him. Whatever you guys decide tho good luck and I'm sure his military experience will help him if he does get out.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mia View Post
                        Hi all, the last time I posted I was very lucky to get such great advice for my husband and our family so thank you all very much!

                        Now... my husband has explored a whole lot of options career wise and he's somewhat settled on making the switch from the Marine Corps to the Police Force- which force, he has no idea. We currently live in California but would like to move to Boston sometime in the future but have been told along with the residency requirements that getting a job on the BPD is next to impossible.

                        That said, we're open to moving anywhere! My husband is currently a Staff Sergeant with 2 years left before his EAS. As much as he loves the Marine Corps, he's definitely feeling the pain of being away from our 3 young sons as much as he is with deployments, month long field ops etc, etc. At that time of his EAS he would have been in for 13 years, so what would be the best route to go for us in making the switch? Does anyone have any first hand experience with the LAPD?

                        Anything you could suggest for him/us to do to get the ball rolling would be great!

                        TIA.
                        Stay away from Michigan!! Im doing everything I can to get out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Telling someone to delay graduate school by 7 years (until such time that her husband has a military retirement pension) is quite a big suggestion.
                          Not any bigger than throwing away 13 years towards a miltary retirement to move to an unknown city and embark upon two unknown careers - with unknown outcomes.

                          Yes, I'm aware that SoCal is expensive, but an expensive city in which one is already established will usually be more livable than one across the country where there are no ties and no support network (unless there is something there in that respect which the OP hasn't mentioned).

                          I am also completely familar with how the transfer of graduate credit works, how schools stack up, etc. To me, however, those things and the achieving of that goal (an MA/MS degree) would take a backseat to another goal that is already more than halfway achieved (a military retirement). What happens if the graduate degree doesn't pan out or her husband can't get a job? With a child in the mix, I would always opt for the "safe" route, not only with the economy in shambles and the job market blowing, big, time, but with health care harder and harder to come by. But we can agree to disagree.
                          "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wow, I go away to tend to the family and I come back to this!lol. You all make very valid points. I'm definitely not against my husband reenlisting, I support him a 100% in what he's doing even though it is a less than ideal career for a family man....

                            My husbands big thing is that although he loves the big picture of what he does and has done for the past 11 years, his growing dissatisfaction with how things are 'done' is really weighing him down and taking it's toll.

                            While financial security is paramount, I also firmly believe that job satisfaction should be equal, or at least almost the same! Life is too short to be miserable....

                            Again though, it's just hard to know what route to take, so we really do appreciate everyone's opinions and insights :-)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Get a federal law enforcement job and you can transfer any place with it and the 13 years in the service will count on the back end of his 20 year fed law enforcement job. With the feds you can go every where or stay in one place forever.

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