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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Mine says not available, weird.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scout0315
    replied
    Go to your account on my usajobs, select applications, and select under application status "more information" beside your NOAA listing....That should transfer you to DOC site, select status, and your status should pop up.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Is there a website or application manager that shows your status? USAJOBS doesn't show one.

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  • Scout0315
    replied
    Update to my application

    “Grade 2 & 3: Applicant referred to the hiring official.”

    Grade 2 VEOA, VRA
    Grade 3 VEOA

    No status on the public announcement.

    Anyone else hear anything?

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  • emeraldcop
    replied
    My agency has a 4 letter acronym instead of 3 letters. Being new here I'm dont know how kindly agencies take to posts.

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  • StateChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by emeraldcop View Post
    I applied, should be interesting to see what happens. I'm a new 1811, but have nearly 10 years with a city PD. I have several years as a detective, but no natural resources type of experience. I only applied to one location, not sure if that will affect how they view me. I'm hoping very much to be one of the lucky ones. Its either this or go back to my old PD.

    I was told that my agency has a three year minimum committment, but I have no idea how they can enforce it unless there is an interagency no poaching policy. From what I've seen so far there is no such thing as we have gotten 1811's from other agencies and we have lost some to other agencies. Good luck all!
    What agency do you work for?

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  • emeraldcop
    replied
    I applied, should be interesting to see what happens. I'm a new 1811, but have nearly 10 years with a city PD. I have several years as a detective, but no natural resources type of experience. I only applied to one location, not sure if that will affect how they view me. I'm hoping very much to be one of the lucky ones. Its either this or go back to my old PD.

    I was told that my agency has a three year minimum committment, but I have no idea how they can enforce it unless there is an interagency no poaching policy. From what I've seen so far there is no such thing as we have gotten 1811's from other agencies and we have lost some to other agencies. Good luck all!

    Leave a comment:


  • brownmi
    replied
    Originally posted by GreenLine View Post
    I don't know that they'll overlook your top choice - usually there are enough people applying for a specific position that they don't need to. I know that if it was me, I'd put Alaska on there, but make it known what my #1 is as well.

    ....Very few agencies can afford to move people just because those people want to move. You need a combination of attrition and empty, must-fill stations, plus maybe some new priorities and new people coming on board. Historically, that comes around for most agencies every few years, but it's never something you should bank on.

    But I've never seen NOAA go out of their way to pick only CITP graduates when they saw other people they wanted.... .
    That’s good to know that people do get transferred out of Alaska after a certain period of time if they want. I guess the same situation applies to me if I would get hired for NY. I'm trying to make sure that the opportunity to transfer out of a POD is not an illusion after you put in your time if you end up in a hard to fill POD. Getting a paid move is always a plus but that wasn’t how I was looking at it. Usually non-promotional moves are at the expense of the employee. Thanks for the insight on Alaska. It's exciting!

    Overall, I was thrilled to see NOAA’s announcement because I’ve been talking with friends about the agency for a few years. A fellow agent made a joke to me asking if I was trading in my GOV for a GOB(oat). LOL Like irishlad2nv said, when the NOAA 1811 openings are announced, they are competitive. The same applies to the FWS and USCG. I applied to the DEU and MAP for NY, OR, WA & AK so we'll see how it goes. Has anyone else reading this thread applied besides Scout0315, dpd0779, and StateChamp?

    As far as CITP, I’ve seen agency “poaching” announcements and I was wondering the reason to not include GS-5/7 with this announcement. Currently, that’s what SIG TARP is doing, "poaching." At one time in the past, there was a rumor that the SACs of several agencies agreed on a “non-poach” clause. Pretty funny, though it makes sense for agencies to creatively fill their needs by not having to send their agents through CITP.

    Thanks for the insight GreenLine and have a good holiday weekend everyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scout0315
    replied
    Thanks

    Originally posted by GreenLine View Post
    As far as having completed CITP...that's always going to be an advantage of both convenience and cost, regardless of agency. But I've never seen NOAA go out of their way to pick only CITP graduates when they saw other people they wanted - lots of former Coasties, former game warden types and people from other environmental agencies, 1811's who have absolutely nothing to do with NOAA's (or any other environment-related) mission, and plenty of local/state cops as well. They have a truly diverse mixture.
    Greenline thanks for your information & suggestions...

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  • GreenLine
    replied
    Will they overlook my top city choice of this announcement if I’m willing to go to Alaska? If I go to Alaska, can I eventually get a transfer to another POD? If not, would I be better off not applying to Alaska?

    Based on what you said about the unknown training dates after CITP due to personnel and funding, is there an advantage to having already completed CITP?
    I don't know that they'll overlook your top choice - usually there are enough people applying for a specific position that they don't need to. I know that if it was me, I'd put Alaska on there, but make it known what my #1 is as well.

    People who have gone to Alaska HAVE transferred out, but not until they did some time there. It seemed as though the less desirable the station, the sooner they were amenable to moving you out: I know people who had to do 3+ years in Southeast Alaska or Anchorage (not bad stations, IMO) and then got transfers, but another person who only did 2 years in Dutch Harbor (which is pretty darned remote) before being moved. Again, it'll depend on staffing levels and what funding is like at the time. Very few agencies can afford to move people just because those people want to move. You need a combination of attrition and empty, must-fill stations, plus maybe some new priorities and new people coming on board. Historically, that comes around for most agencies every few years, but it's never something you should bank on.

    Going back to funding...if an agency can be said to be "well funded", NOAA-OLE is one of them, IMO. They seem to have a decent budget. Better than most small agencies, anyway. I probably wasn't as clear as I should have been, but the after-FLETC training is more dependent on slots and getting enough people for NET-Basic than it is on funding. FLETC's boat program was "saved" a couple of times from the axe by NOAA-OLE back in the day; they've bought boats and provided instructors when the program didn't have any. So when they want a handful of slots, FLETC usually gives 'em up.

    As far as having completed CITP...that's always going to be an advantage of both convenience and cost, regardless of agency. But I've never seen NOAA go out of their way to pick only CITP graduates when they saw other people they wanted - lots of former Coasties, former game warden types and people from other environmental agencies, 1811's who have absolutely nothing to do with NOAA's (or any other environment-related) mission, and plenty of local/state cops as well. They have a truly diverse mixture.

    Leave a comment:


  • brownmi
    replied
    Originally posted by dpd0779 View Post
    I applied to the NJ vacancy. When filling out the questions it asks what other duty stations would you like to be considered, I put MD, VA and NY. Do I still have to apply separately for those vacancies? I don't know why they would ask that question if you had to apply for each office.
    I'm wondering if there is a selecting official/panel per office/POD. HR makes the initial qualification determinations from the announcements and then forwards the packages to the selecting official. Candidates are ranked separately for each city so you could be on multiple city lists if you qualify. You have to select all the cities you want to be considered for with each announcement (DEU and MAP). Two applications will be the most you have; one for DEU and one for MAP.

    Leave a comment:


  • brownmi
    replied
    Originally posted by GreenLine View Post
    Sometime after CITP, NOAA 1811's attend the agency's NET-Basic program, which is roughly a month long and covers NOAA-specific topics, laws enforced, things like that. NOAA 1811's also attend FLETC's Marine Law Enforcement Training Program, or "boat school", which is also a month long and is covered on FLETC's website.

    Now, when a new NOAA 1811 completes these courses is the big question mark. It historically depended on when the agency had enough bodies to fill the courses or enough slots. For example, it has not been uncommon for some new agents to be on the job for up to 2 years before attending NET-Basic (which shows that it's arguably not a vital prerequisite for doing the work), mainly because it took that long for the agency to gather enough new bodies who hadn't been through it yet. You'll go to boat school whenever a slot opens up, usually 5 or 6 at a time, mixed in with other agencies. Fun course, but can be academically intensive.

    NOAA's FTO program used to consist of one week at the regional HQ followed by three separate two-week stints with different FTO's. They used to try to send you to at least one session that was outside your region so you'd get a feel for what different regions do, but funding/timing doesn't always make that possible.

    IMO, if you happen to be in NY, that doesn't necessarily mean they'll keep you there. Depends on your interest and what they have open. Once you come on board, NOAA transfers are not that plentiful because it's a fairly small agency. At one point, they had instituted a three-year minimum rule before transferring someone, but that may be dated info. If you want to better your chances for getting hired, select Alaska. There's quite a bit of turnover because not everyone can handle living there.
    Thanks, that answers a lot. That's one of my big questions and concerns regarding a hard to fill office. Will they overlook my top city choice of this announcement if I’m willing to go to Alaska? If I go to Alaska, can I eventually get a transfer to another POD? If not, would I be better off not applying to Alaska?

    Based on what you said about the unknown training dates after CITP due to personnel and funding, is there an advantage to having already completed CITP?

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    OK I just read it again, I only applied under the MAP announcement, so I don't have to apply for each duty station. If you apply under MAP and DEU you would have to do two separate applications.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I applied to the NJ vacancy. When filling out the questions it asks what other duty stations would you like to be considered, I put MD, VA and NY. Do I still have to apply separately for those vacancies? I don't know why they would ask that question if you had to apply for each office.

    Leave a comment:


  • GreenLine
    replied
    Oh. So is the FOTP the only aspect that is not completed at FLETC?
    Sometime after CITP, NOAA 1811's attend the agency's NET-Basic program, which is roughly a month long and covers NOAA-specific topics, laws enforced, things like that. NOAA 1811's also attend FLETC's Marine Law Enforcement Training Program, or "boat school", which is also a month long and is covered on FLETC's website.

    Now, when a new NOAA 1811 completes these courses is the big question mark. It historically depended on when the agency had enough bodies to fill the courses or enough slots. For example, it has not been uncommon for some new agents to be on the job for up to 2 years before attending NET-Basic (which shows that it's arguably not a vital prerequisite for doing the work), mainly because it took that long for the agency to gather enough new bodies who hadn't been through it yet. You'll go to boat school whenever a slot opens up, usually 5 or 6 at a time, mixed in with other agencies. Fun course, but can be academically intensive.

    NOAA's FTO program used to consist of one week at the regional HQ followed by three separate two-week stints with different FTO's. They used to try to send you to at least one session that was outside your region so you'd get a feel for what different regions do, but funding/timing doesn't always make that possible.

    IMO, if you happen to be in NY, that doesn't necessarily mean they'll keep you there. Depends on your interest and what they have open. Once you come on board, NOAA transfers are not that plentiful because it's a fairly small agency. At one point, they had instituted a three-year minimum rule before transferring someone, but that may be dated info. If you want to better your chances for getting hired, select Alaska. There's quite a bit of turnover because not everyone can handle living there.

    Leave a comment:

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