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Federal or other investigation work after 37?

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  • Federal or other investigation work after 37?

    Hello,

    I just turned 37 and "expired." I got to the later testing stages for several agencies but didn't pass and can't retest due to my age. Reading about the new FBI hiring push is like a daily kick in the balls.

    Are there jobs for investigators after 37?

    After spending a lot of time reading this board and others, I'm pretty sure there aren't, but just want to make sure because this was something I really wanted to do. I was most interested in fighting crimes like human trafficking, racketeering, fraud and embezzlement, etc., crimes handled AFAIK by 1811-type investigators at federal agencies.

    I'm considering state and local departments but patrol focuses on a different type of crimes and criminals. I highly respect this work but I don't know if I have the right temperament for it.

    Any ideas?

  • #2
    Not sure if this is true or not, but I've read elsewhere on here that Border Patrol raised the age to 40 or so. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong. It may not be investigations right away but it may be a way to get in then move over to an 1811. Try honorfirst.com. Very good site for BP types.

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    • #3
      Not sure if this is true or not, but I've read elsewhere on here that Border Patrol raised the age to 40 or so. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong. It may not be investigations right away but it may be a way to get in then move over to an 1811. Try honorfirst.com. Very good site for BP types.
      The Border Patrol currently grants applicants a waiver up to age 40, but in order to "move over" to an 1811 gig from there, the agency you aspire to work for with would have to grant you the same waiver to allow you to retire past your 57th birthday. Traditionally, this has been a no-go. May or may not change in the future, but it's not something I would bank on - meaning if someone wants to go that route, they should really want to be a Border Patrol Agent first and foremost.

      That said, I thought the BP used to have some kind of investigative unit, so that may also be an option, as well.
      "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

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      • #4
        Thanks guys for taking the time to respond. I think some of those other jobs are rare to come around and even harder to get than 1811 positions because they don't do mass hiring through a testing process. For example, when was the last time DEA hired Diversion Investigators?

        I'll take your advice and keep an eye on the job listings, though my chances don't seem too good at this point.

        To the younger people out there, as they say, apply early and often and assume the process will take years.

        Who knows, maybe in a couple of years they'll raise more age limits to 40 and I can jump back in (though I won't hold my breath waiting).

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        • #5
          Avast-in those state and local job searches, you may try things like your States Attorney Generals office (well, not in DC I guess but nearby!) and District Attorneys offices, they typically have Investigators who do not do patrol. Also, other state agencies may have an investigative arm that is not well publicized-for example NY has Investigators in their Tax Department, things like that. Good luck.

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          • #6
            The Border Patrol is higher up to age 40, for now at least. There are many plain clothes investigative details available after two years of service. You could also go with a local PD/SO but in my experience, investigative assignments usually take a lot longer on average to get into with a PD.

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            • #7
              Have you looked into State level law enforcement or investigative agencies? I believe most states have them in some form. I know here in MN, as in some other states they exist in a Department of Public Safety. California even has it's own "DEA" so to speak. Another example would be Florida's Department of Law Enforcement. Bad news is that it seems they generally recruit experienced local cops, but I'm no expert.

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