Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Agencies that will hire a 37 y/o

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SA13
    replied
    It should also be noted that one does not need to attend CITP as an 1811.

    FBI, DEA, and USPIS have their own basic academies and therefore do not attend CITP, but FBI and DEA SAs, and Postal Inspectors, are all 1811s. AFOSI had their own academy until FY03, and their civilian agents are all 1811s.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigTrooper
    replied
    Excellent, thanks for the clarification. It makes good sense...

    Leave a comment:


  • SA13
    replied
    Originally posted by BigTrooper View Post
    Gotcha. I thought once you went to CITP, you were an 1811. Is it the SABT specific to each agency that makes them 1811's? What is the "deciding" factor between a basic criminal investigator and an 1811?
    It's really what the agency hired the person to do, ie what job series the person applied for and was hired to do. It has nothing to do with whether they get to attend particular training. For example, when I got hired by my first agency, I applied for, and was hired as an 1811. From the first day I started I was an "1811," and paid in that job series, despite the fact that I wouldn't attend CITP and the agency specific basic course for several months, with my badge, creds, and swearing in coming many months after being hired at the end of all that training.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigTrooper
    replied
    Originally posted by SA13 View Post
    EEOs are not 1811s. They attend the Criminal Investigator Training Program (CITP) at FLETC, but they do not attend the Special Agent Basic Training (SABT) at the ATF National Academy at FLETC.

    Further, there are other federal employees, who are LEOs, that attend CITP, but are not 1811s. Just because a job allows or requires someone to attend CITP does not mean they will be employed as an 1811, and does not mean they are in a "covered" job.
    Gotcha. I thought once you went to CITP, you were an 1811. Is it the SABT specific to each agency that makes them 1811's? What is the "deciding" factor between a basic criminal investigator and an 1811?

    Leave a comment:


  • SA13
    replied
    EEOs are not 1811s. They attend the Criminal Investigator Training Program (CITP) at FLETC, but they do not attend the Special Agent Basic Training (SABT) at the ATF National Academy at FLETC.

    Further, there are other federal employees, who are LEOs, that attend CITP, but are not 1811s. Just because a job allows or requires someone to attend CITP does not mean they will be employed as an 1811, and does not mean they are in a "covered" job.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigTrooper
    replied
    SA13's mentioning of the ATF's Explosive Enforcement Officer piqued my interest. Here is the fact sheet right off the ATF website if any of you are interested:

    http://www.atf.gov/press/factsheets/...tsheet-eeo.pdf

    Evidently they are 1811's first (or too), as evidenced in this excerpt:

    Training
    Following criminal investigator basic training, EEOs take ATF courses on Post Blast Investigation, Chemistry of Pyrotechnics, Advanced Explosives Destruct Training, Advanced Explosives Investigation Training and other internationally available courses. EEOs also attend the Hazardous Devices School (HDS) at the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala. HDS is a 6-week certification course required for many of the responsibilities administered by EEOs. Additionally, the majority of the EEOs previously served as explosives specialists in the U.S. military where they received one year of specialized explosives training.

    There are only 25 of them in the ATF, with 3 supervisory EEO's. Very exclusive club, but a pretty cool job description nonetheless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tirofijo
    replied
    Originally posted by Monkeybomb View Post
    I had a couple of ATF agents attached to my team. They were trying to recruit a couple of us. I would have enjoyed the job but wasn't too keen on relocating. The other guy was very interested but i'm not sure if he hired on or not. He was definately over the age limit. The acted like he could get a waiver no problem. Couldn't tell you what the waiver was. I'm not a Fed.
    Many times agents aren't the best source of information regarding hiring practices.

    Leave a comment:


  • SA13
    replied
    Originally posted by Monkeybomb View Post
    I had a couple of ATF agents attached to my team. They were trying to recruit a couple of us. I would have enjoyed the job but wasn't too keen on relocating. The other guy was very interested but i'm not sure if he hired on or not. He was definately over the age limit. The acted like he could get a waiver no problem. Couldn't tell you what the waiver was. I'm not a Fed.
    Were they possibly trying to recruit you for a job as an Explosives Enforcement Officer (EEO)? EEOs are badge/gun carrying LEOs, but are NOT covered by the special LE retirement, and therefore do not have the age restriction. Again, there is no "age waiver" for individuals trying to get a "covered" job as an 1811 (aka Special Agent) with ATF. The only people who can get hired after their 37th birthday as a Special Agent are people who had prior time in a "covered" job.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tirofijo
    replied
    Originally posted by kiddk1 View Post
    on Usajobs.gov it still states 37 as the maximum age for Border Patrol
    BP website confirms it is 40. http://www.borderpatrol.gov/faqs.html

    Probably a cut and paste error on USAjobs.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiddk1
    replied
    Originally posted by Tirofijo View Post
    Border Patrol now hires up to age 40.

    No one knows if or when they will go back to a 37 yo cutofff.
    on Usajobs.gov it still states 37 as the maximum age for Border Patrol

    Leave a comment:


  • Monkeybomb
    replied
    I had a couple of ATF agents attached to my team. They were trying to recruit a couple of us. I would have enjoyed the job but wasn't too keen on relocating. The other guy was very interested but i'm not sure if he hired on or not. He was definately over the age limit. The acted like he could get a waiver no problem. Couldn't tell you what the waiver was. I'm not a Fed.

    Leave a comment:


  • woettinger
    replied
    Isabella v Department of State may change the 37 yoa limit, for qualified vets.

    Leave a comment:


  • SA13
    replied
    Originally posted by Monkeybomb View Post
    There are always waivers for Federal work.
    You know I've seen this mentioned on this forum several times, but in several years of working in a "covered" fed LEO job as an 1811 I've NEVER had anyone who worked in HR for an agency tell me there was a waiver for INDIVIDUALS to get hired and "covered" in a fed LEO job that has an age limit. Some agencies have hired people after their 37th birthday who were NOT "covered" by the special LEO retirement. Also, some agencies have been allowed to open up hiring to ALL applicants up to a certain age. Recent examples were USSS Uniform Division, and Border Patrol.
    The biggest problem I'm told anyway is the mandatory retirement age. If you have prior federal or military experience you are probably more likely to get a waiver.
    Again, no waivers. If you have prior COVERED fed LEO time, you can switch agencies after the 37th birthday, but if you fed time (LEO or not) was not covered time, the age limit still applies. Further, military time regardless of specialty does not affect the age limit.
    This is what I heard from BATF anyway.
    Who at ATF? I work with, and am friends with several ATF agents. I've helped several friends apply with various agencies including ATF, including some friends who were close to the age limit, and have never heard of ATF ever hiring someone as a GS-1811 Criminal Investigator (aka Special Agent) over the age of 37 unless that person had prior COVERED fed LEO time. ATF does hire many people in other job series that are past their 37th birthday, but not 1811s.

    Leave a comment:


  • Monkeybomb
    replied
    There are always waivers for Federal work. The biggest problem I'm told anyway is the mandatory retirement age. If you have prior federal or military experience you are probably more likely to get a waiver.

    This is what I heard from BATF anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • firecop_22
    replied
    Thanks for all the info. I will let him know.

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 5238 users online. 198 members and 5040 guests.

Most users ever online was 19,482 at 12:44 PM on 09-29-2011.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X